Happy Sunday!

I was having a conversation with someone this week, where we were discussing inequality. It's a topic I have been thinking about for a few months now, and it's certainly something that has been execrated by Covid-19.

The last time we had a global recession, the financial crisis of '08/'09, everyone in all corners of society was deeply impacted, in broadly equal measure. The rich lost their businesses. The poor lost their homes. The employed lost their jobs. And the unemployed couldn't gain new employment.

But this time, things are very different. The only people losing their jobs are those who are unable to work remotely from home — tending to be the lower-paying jobs (waiters, cleaners, hairdressers, etc.). At the same time, our key workers (nurses, bus/train drivers, supermarket assistants, etc.), are having to continue working to ensure a functioning society; risking their lives every time they step out of their homes to go to work. There is a disproportionately high rate of key workers among those who have died as a direct result of Covid.

At the same time, the wealth of billionaires are soaring and is now at an all-time high. In the midst of what's happening in the wider society, Apple became the first $2 trillion company, while Jeff Bezos added £10bn to his fortune in just one day. The S&P 500 has also hit record highs during this period. A clear indication of rising inequality and a widening gap between the rich and the poor.

It's also possible that Covid is exposing the pre-existing inequality within our society. In which case, we need to work towards building a fair and equal society, where everyone, irrespective of background and socioeconomic standing, can thrive and succeed.

Have an awesome week ahead,
Samuel


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Tweet of the Week


This Week's Wisdom

"Most of what happens in life is entirely out of your control, and while blind self-belief might disguise that fact for a while, it will eventually prove an anaemic opponent to brute reality."

— In the book Happy, by Darren Brown

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