Hey readers 👋

Earlier this week, I recalled a paper I read almost a year ago. The paper is titled The Mundanity of Excellence. The paper is a result of Chambliss’ research. He studied thousands of swimmers and sets out in the paper what separates amateur swimmers from professional swimmers and Olympic medalists.

I wish I could tell you that there was a secret to Olympic medallists success, but I’d be lying. There is no secret.

The only thing that separates these swimmers is that the Olympic medalists actually enjoyed doing what other swimmers hated the most. Things like the super early morning monotonous swim along the lanes to improve their technique and endurance.

The paper also discussed that successful swimmers had incredible levels of discipline and an outstanding and positive attitude.

Chamblis goes on to confirm that based on his study, talent doesn’t exist - and this isn’t the first time that we’re hearing this. “Talented” swimmers weren’t any more successful than others. Swimmers, who appeared to have a natural talent in their early teens weren’t more successful in adulthood. It didn’t make sense.

In fact, the Olympic medalists were rarely ever considered “talented” during their early years - they were quite dull and ordinary.

When I read this article, it made me realise that almost anything is possible. We just need to remain committed, consistent and do what others hate. Eventually, through repetition and when we become good at what others hated - we’d learn to enjoy it.

This notion ties in well with an earlier newsletter, where I discussed that whenever you have a choice to make, you should always choose the harder option.

So what are you waiting for? Take control of your life today and start making the changes you want to see. Be patient, but the results will come.

If you want to be successful, find out what no one else in your field is doing - then do it. Everyday.

Have an awesome week ahead 🤩

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Featured Article

Why You Don’t Need to Have Your Life Figured Out in Your 20s
The pressure on millennials to find their purpose is unwelcome. I explore the impact it has on mental health and advise on deciding on a career path.

3 Things I've Enjoyed This Week

  1. Make Good Art by Neil Gramman - An excellent commencement speech to graduates in the arts. Always do good work, on time and never do things just for the money - and you’ll do well in life.
  2. Career Advice: How to choose the perfect career - It turns out that finding the perfect career doesn’t have to be difficult. Mark argues that the perfect career comes at the intersection of what you value, what you’re good at and what the world values.
  3. The Difference Between Amateurs and Professionals - This post slots in perfectly, given the content in my intro. Want to know what separates amateurs and professionals? Then look no further.

Tweet of the Week


This Week's Wisdom

Imagine for one idyllic moment that you gave absolutely zero fucks about what anyone thought about you. Imagine all those things you might do that you’d been previously scared about. Imagine all the liberation of wasted time and energy. Imagine all the freeing up of thoughts and doubts and voices in your head. Imagine.
- Rob Moore, in the book: I’m Worth More

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Every Sunday, I write a lesson I wished I had learned 10 years earlier, to feed our brains with intelligent content to start our week.

I also share interesting articles, book quotes, and the occasional speech or TED talk to help us all get smarter, wiser, and live better.

I follow my curiosity at SamuelObe.com

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